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Expert: Tale of Worker Asleep in Cargo Hold is a Warning

April 16, 2015 11:35 am | by Manuel Valdes and David Koenig, Associated Press | News | Comments

The misadventure of a baggage handler who fell asleep in the cargo hold of a jetliner should be a warning for airlines to improve security procedures, safety experts said.  The worker banged on the plane for help shortly after takeoff  from Seattle. Pilots heard the noise and quickly returned to the airport. The worker was not injured.

Investigators Warn Airplane Computers Could be Hacked

April 16, 2015 11:25 am | by Anne Flaherty, Associated Press | News | Comments

The finding by the Government Accountability Office presents chilling new scenarios for...

Unseasonable Rain Causes Heartache for Many Indian Farmers

April 16, 2015 11:20 am | by Biswajeet Banerjee, Associated Press | News | Comments

April is usually a time of celebration for millions of farmers across northern India. The winter...

Companies Need Resources to Stay Up and Running

April 9, 2015 11:44 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Blogs | Comments

Resource management is something that businesses of all shapes and sizes must deal with on some...

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Weekly news and features for business continuity professionals

California Regulator Suggests Utility is Too Big to be Safe

April 9, 2015 11:36 am | by Ellen Knickmeyer, Associated Press | News | Comments

California Public Utilities Commission President Michael Picker said he would ask the commission's staff to study "the culture of safety" and the structure of Pacific Gas & Electric Co., which has its gas and electricity operations under a single corporate board and chief executive.

Talking Turkey: How Bird Flu Outbreaks are Playing Out

April 9, 2015 11:22 am | by Steve Karnowski, Associated Press | News | Comments

A deadly strain of bird flu has reached the Midwest, killing or requiring hundreds of thousands of turkeys to be euthanized. H5N2 is a highly contagious virus that kills commercial poultry quickly once it gets into a barn, but risk to the public is considered low.

Pemex Begins to Restore Production at Fire-Damaged Platform

April 7, 2015 10:21 am | by Katherine Corcoran, Associated Press | News | Comments

Mexico's state-run oil company continues to search for three missing workers from a platform fireball that killed four others, while beginning to restore production at the damaged Gulf of Mexico facility, officials said.  The cause of the accident is still under investigation.

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Dallas hospital seeks dismissal of nurse's suit over Ebola

April 7, 2015 10:17 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

A hospital operator denied allegations of poor training and improper preparation in seeking dismissal of a lawsuit by a nurse who contracted Ebola while caring for the first U.S. patient to succumb to the deadly disease.  Texas Health Resources filed a response to the March 2 lawsuit by nurse Nina Pham,

Truck Explodes after Attempted Gasoline Theft

April 1, 2015 1:11 pm | by Christopher Sherman, Associated Press | News | Comments

The death toll in a gasoline tanker truck explosion in southeastern Mexico rose to 14 , the result of an attempted theft of fuel in an area that authorities say has a long reputation for roadside thefts.  Gasoline theft has been a persistent problem in Mexico, but siphoning directly from pipelines has received the most attention.

Business Continuity Professionals are Turning to Metrics: Part Two

March 30, 2015 2:33 pm | by Joe Shust, Editor | Articles | Comments

Organizations across a variety of industries are turning to metrics to determine whether their programs work and if they are getting a return on their investment.  Business continuity professionals are no exception.  More and more, BC pros are turning to metrics to determine how effective their programs are and convey that to senior management.

Sierra Leone Asks Residents to Stay Home for Three Days

March 30, 2015 1:51 pm | by Clarence Roy-Macaulay, Associated Press | News | Comments

Sierra Leone's 6 million people were told to stay home for three days beginning Friday, except for religious services, as the West African nation attempted a final push to rid itself of Ebola.  Thousands of teams were out reminding people how Ebola is spread and how to prevent it. Teams were also going to search for Ebola cases, particularly in regions around the capital and in the north, where flare-ups persist.

Government Announces Five-Year Plan to Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

March 30, 2015 1:26 pm | by Nedra Pickler, Associated Press | News | Comments

The World Health Organization said last year that bacteria resistant to antibiotics have spread to every part of the world and might lead to a future where minor infections like strep throat could kill. Antibiotic resistance also threatens animal health, agriculture, and the economy.  In an interview with WebMD, President Barack Obama said over-prescribing antibiotics is a serious problem.

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Ebola Victim May Have Caught Virus from Survivor

March 25, 2015 2:38 pm | by Jonathan Paye-Layleh, Associated Press | News | Comments

A woman who tested positive for Ebola in Liberia last week is dating a survivor of the disease, a health official said, offering a possible explanation for how she became the country's first confirmed case in weeks.  The patient is now being treated at the Monrovia Medical Unit, a U.S.-built field hospital.

Vendor Management Critical to Supply Chain Continuity

March 24, 2015 12:08 pm | by Joe Shust, Editor | Articles | Comments

Maintaining supply chain operations, especially across state and international borders, can be a major challenge for organizations.  Part of what makes supply chain continuity such a challenge is the reliance on and management of vendors.

Liberians Volunteering for Ebola Vaccine Trial

March 23, 2015 10:12 am | by Jonathan Paye-Layleh, Associated Press | News | Comments

The gruesome toll of West Africa's Ebola outbreak, which has killed more than 4,200 Liberians of the more than 10,000 who have succumbed to the disease, has intensified efforts to find a vaccine for a disease that previously infected relatively few people in remote areas.

Companies Turn to Automation to Prevent Down Time

March 19, 2015 10:25 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Articles | Comments

Managing critical equipment and avoiding unplanned down time is key for any organization to remain profitable and conduct business effectively.  Some larger companies, like GE, are turning to data based solutions to help keep their own infrastructure, as well as that of their customers, running smoothly.

Judge Dismisses Class Action Suit Against Exxon Mobil

March 19, 2015 8:49 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

A federal class-action lawsuit against Exxon Mobil Corporation over a 2013 crude oil spill in central Arkansas has been dismissed by a federal judge, who acknowledged in his ruling that his decision seems unfair. U.S. District Judge Brian Miller on dismissed the lawsuit with prejudice, meaning it cannot be refiled.

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Could Change in Climate, Environment Impact the Spread of Infectious Diseases?

March 17, 2015 10:05 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Articles | Comments

Could a changing climate and changing environments have an impact on the spread of infectious diseases?  At least one Zoologist thinks so.  In an article posted in February on Continuity Insights’ sister publications R&D,  Daniel Brooks of University of Nebraska-Lincoln discussed how the spread of infectious diseases like the West Nile Virus and Ebola could be linked to changing climate.

Ten Americans Evacuated After Ebola Exposure

March 16, 2015 3:15 pm | by Clarence Roy-Macaulay and Robbie Corey-Boulet, Associated Press | News | Comments

Ten health care workers with a Boston-based nonprofit organization responding to Sierra Leone's Ebola outbreak are to be evacuated to the United States after one of their colleagues was infected with the deadly disease.  The Partners in Health staffer who became infected has already been evacuated and is receiving treatment at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland.

The Importance of Infectious Disease Planning: A Personal Experience

March 10, 2015 11:12 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Blogs | Comments

Infectious diseases are certainly not a new topic on here at Continuity Insights.  Ebola, Measles and MERS have all been in the news cycle in the last year and have been covered extensively on the website and in the CI Bulletin.   I am beginning to understand why experienced BC pros are concerned about and plan for infectious diseases even if the odds of getting them are unlikely.

Crematorium Dismantled as Liberia Gets Ebola Under Control

March 9, 2015 4:29 pm | by Jonathan Paye-Layleh, Associated Press | News | Comments

 Marking the progress in controlling its Ebola outbreak, the Liberian government dismantled a crematorium and removed drums containing the ashes of more than 3,000 Ebola victims cremated during the height of the epidemic, whose last patient was discharged last week.

Keeping Supply Chain Operations Running Critical for Any Business

March 5, 2015 10:43 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Articles | Comments

Global organizations rely on their supply chains to deliver products and services to their customers in a timely and efficient manner.  While these complex chains are critical to day-to-day operations, their complexity leaves them open to a wide range of problems, which can result in serious down time.  

Could 'Marshall Plan' for Ebola be a Possibility?

March 4, 2015 3:38 pm | by Lorne Cook, Associated Press | News | Comments

 Liberia's president called for an Ebola "Marshall Plan" to help rebuild economies in West African nations devastated by the virus.  Ellen Johnson Sirleaf said that "we need our international partners to remain committed to us," as the number of deaths from the disease approaches 10,000.

"Super Bug" Worth Watching for Business Continuity Professionals

March 3, 2015 11:43 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Articles | Comments

The death of two patients at the Ronald Regan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles has renewed focus on the “super bug” known as CRE, or Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae.  According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), CRE are difficult to treat because of their resistance to antibiotics.  

Government Mulling New Oil Train Car Regulations

March 2, 2015 4:15 pm | by Joan Lowy, Associated Press | News | Comments

 Fiery wrecks of trains hauling crude oil have intensified pressure on the Obama administration to approve tougher standards for railroads and tank cars despite industry complaints that it could cost billions and slow freight deliveries.

Commuter May Have Exposed 1,500 to Measles

March 2, 2015 4:12 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Officials say the commuter who may have exposed at least 1,500 Bay Area Rapid Transit riders to measles also ate at a popular Northern California restaurant.  BART warned commuters for a second time this month about possible exposure. 

United Nations Urges Persistence in Ebola Fight

March 2, 2015 3:31 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

The United Nations is urging donors, organizations and countries fighting Ebola in West Africa not to give in to complacency as the death toll from the virus climbs toward 10,000.  U.N. experts said the spread of the disease in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone has dropped to almost 10 percent of what it was in September.

Speaker's Soapbox: Nadav Davidai of Control Risks and Emily Lord of RX Response

February 26, 2015 9:49 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Articles | Comments

Nadav Davidai of Control Risks and Emily Lord of RX Response will present "Including Your Supply Chain Partners in Large-Scale Exercise Simulations."  Their presentation will focus on working with multiple partners to organize exercise that align with the objectives of everyone involved.

U.S. Government Contracts with Quebec Biotech Company to Make Anti-Ebola Drug

February 26, 2015 8:57 am | by Helen Branswell, The Canadian Press | News | Comments

A Quebec City biotech company has been awarded a contract to make a ZMapp-like product to fight Ebola.  The U.S. government's Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority issued a contract to make monoclonal Ebola antibodies to Medicago.

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