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Despite Low Death Rate, Lassa Fever Worth Watching

May 28, 2015 11:33 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Articles | Comments

A New Jersey man died Monday from Lassa Fever, a rare infectious disease that originates in West Africa, after returning from Liberia.  According to the Centers for Disease Control, the disease is endemic to West Africa and is named after the town in Nigeria where it was first discovered in 1969.  While the disease is uncommon in the United States, that is not the case in West Africa.

Congress Wants to Know how Thieves Stole Tax Info From IRS

May 27, 2015 3:46 pm | by Stephen Ohlemacher, Associated Press | News | Comments

Congress is demanding answers about how identity thieves were able to steal the personal tax...

Video: Diversity and the Evolution of Business Continuity

May 26, 2015 12:33 pm | by Joe Shust, Editor | Videos | Comments

Mark Armour, Global Director of Business Continuity for Brinks, Inc., discusses where he thinks...

Severe Storms a Reminder of the Danger of Catastrophic Weather

May 26, 2015 10:56 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Blogs | Comments

Severe storms and flash flooding in Texas and Oklahoma have left eight dead and others missing...

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Weekly news and features for business continuity professionals

Takeaways on Cyber Security from CIMC 2015

May 21, 2015 10:12 am | by Jenny Chen, Senior Certified Expert IT Consultant, IBM | Blogs | Comments

Jenny Chen, Senior Certified Expert IT Consultant for IBM, discusses her experience at the 2015 Continuity Insights Management Conference, including her takeaways about the state of cyber security and the good, bad and ugly ways in which BC pros deal with it.

Speakers Discuss Emerging Issues at Full-Day CPE Meeting

May 21, 2015 9:54 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Articles | Comments

The New York City Chapter of the Contingency Planning Exchange (CPE) hosted its third annual full-day conference, which featured presentations about relevant and emerging business continuity issues. The organization aims to help business continuity professionals continue to educate themselves while also getting the opportunity to network with others in the  the field.

California Oil Sop-Up Starts, Thousands of Gallons Gathered

May 21, 2015 9:44 am | by Christopher Weber and Brian Melley, Associated Press | News | Comments

 More than 6,000 gallons of oil had been raked, skimmed and vacuumed from a spill that stretched across 9 miles of California coast in a cleanup effort that is now going 24 hours a day, officials said, but that's some of the sticky, stinking goo that escaped from a broken pipeline.

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Unions Urge Amtrak to Put Second Crew Member in Locomotives

May 21, 2015 9:40 am | by Michael Sisak, Associated Press | News | Comments

The union for Amtrak's locomotive engineers urged the railroad  to put a second crew member at the controls of trains on the busy Northeast Corridor, where a derailment killed eight people and injured more than 200 others.  Amtrak hasn't had a second crew member in the locomotive of its Northeast Corridor trains since Congress ended the requirement in the early 1980s.

Video: Gaining Executive Support and 'Continuity 2.0'

May 19, 2015 12:09 pm | by Joe Shust, Editor | Videos | Comments

David Lindstedt of Readiness Analytics continues his discussion on metrics, including how they can be used to gain executive support.  He also discusses how metrics can cause business continuity professionals to look at the industry in a new light.

Amtrak Liable for no More Than $200 Million in Crash

May 19, 2015 10:30 am | by Eileen Sullivan, Associated Press | News | Comments

 For the first time, Amtrak could face a $200 million payout to train crash victims — the limit set by Congress. But that may be too low to cover the costs of the eight lives lost and more than 200 people injured in last week's derailment in Philadelphia.

Feds project Lake Mead below drought trigger point in 2017

May 19, 2015 9:55 am | by Ken Ritter, Associated Press | News | Comments

 Federal water managers released a report projecting that Lake Mead's water levels will fall below a point in January 2017 that would force supply cuts to Arizona and Nevada.  The effects could be serious. Arizona's allocation of Colorado River water could be cut 11.4 percent, or by an amount normally used by more than 600,000 homes. Nevada's share could be reduced 4.3 percent. 

Amtrak Trains Back in Service on busy Northeast Corridor

May 19, 2015 9:25 am | by Michael Sisak, Associated Press | News | Comments

 Amtrak trains began rolling on the busy Northeast Corridor early Monday, the first time in almost a week following a deadly crash in Philadelphia, and officials vowed to have safer trains and tracks while investigators worked to determine the cause of the derailment.

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Tragic Derailment Presents Business Continuity Challenges

May 14, 2015 11:31 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Articles | Comments

Details are still being revealed after an Amtrak train derailed near Philadelphia Tuesday night, leaving seven dead and more than 200 injured.  For business continuity professionals, train derailments present a unique set of problems, particularly when they involve passenger trains.  One incident can result in a host of different potential disruptions.

Video: Quantifying the Value of Continuity

May 14, 2015 11:15 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Videos | Comments

David Lindstedt, Founder of Readiness Analytics, discusses metrics, their importance to business continuity professionals and how they can be used to answer the question "is it working?"  This will be part one of a two part video, check back next week for more.

Fire Guts Slipper Factory in Philippines, Dozens Feared Dead

May 14, 2015 10:26 am | by Oliver Teves, Associated Press | News | Comments

A fire gutted a rubber slipper factory in a suburb of the Philippine capital Wednesday, possibly killing dozens of workers who ran to the second floor in hopes of escaping only to become trapped by the smoky inferno, officials said.  At least three bodies have been recovered and fire officials found no survivors after the fire was put under control.

How California Golf Courses are Saving Water

May 14, 2015 10:24 am | by Gillian Flaccus, Associated Press | News | Comments

California golf courses are teeing up water conservation measures as the state enters its fourth summer of epic drought. A look at some of the ways they are cutting back.  Small changes, such as watering less in areas that don't get a lot of foot traffic, can help cut back on waste.

The Nepal Quakes, The Recovery Process and the Human Side of Resilience

May 12, 2015 10:39 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Blogs | Comments

Less than one month after a massive earthquake killed more than 8.150 and flattened buildings in Nepal, the small South Asian nation has been struck again.  Another earthquake, this time a magnitude 7.3 quake, hit north of the country’s capital of Kathmandu.  Early reports put the death toll at 37 with at least 1,117 injured.  

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Another Major Earthquake Shakes Nepal, Killing at Least 37

May 12, 2015 10:23 am | by Binaj Gurubacharya and Katy Daigle, Associated Press | News | Comments

A major earthquake hit a remote mountain region of Nepal on Tuesday, killing at least 37 people while triggering landslides and toppling buildings less than three weeks after the Himalayan nation was ravaged by its worst quake in decades.  

New Malaysia Air CEO Vows Turnaround for Battered Airline

May 12, 2015 10:19 am | by Eileen Ng, Associated Press | News | Comments

The new CEO of Malaysia Airlines said its financial situation is more challenging than anticipated and it will shrink in size as it tries to overcome a tarnished image with the travel industry and the public.  Malaysia Airlines was battered last year by double jet disasters. Its government owner has brought in a new CEO to oversee a 6 billion ringgit ($1.7 billion) turnaround.

Reactor Could be Out For Weeks After Fire, Oil Leak

May 12, 2015 10:12 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

 A reactor at a New York nuclear power plant could be offline for weeks because of a transformer fire and oil leak.  Several thousand gallons of oil spilled into the Hudson River after a weekend transformer fire on the non-nuclear side of the Indian Point plant.

It's All About Restoration, Not Backup! … Or is it?

May 7, 2015 11:28 am | by Joe Starzyk, Senior Business Development Executive, IBM Resiliency Services | Blogs | Comments

Joe Starzyk, Senior Business Development Executive for IBM Resiliency Services, discusses the importance of focusing on data backup, different ways organizations should back their data up and how it can and will lead to faster recovery times in the long run.

Report: Germanwings Crash Co-Pilot Tried Slow Descent before Bringing Plane Down

May 6, 2015 2:15 pm | by Jamey Keaten, Associated Press | News | Comments

Authorities are still puzzling over why co-pilot Andreas Lubitz, who had suffered from suicidal tendencies and depression in the past, sent the Barcelona-to-Duesseldorf flight straight into the French Alps on March 24, killing all 150 people on board.

Keeping an NFL Stadium Secure: ACP Visits Home of Giants, Jets

May 5, 2015 11:33 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Articles | Comments

On Friday, May 1, members of the Association of Contingency Planners’ Garden State Chapter were given an opportunity to tour MetLife Stadium, home of both the New York Giants and New York Jets, and learn about the ins and outs of how its security team manages the daunting task of keeping tens of thousands safe.

Could Growing Cyber Focus be a Boon for Business Continuity?

May 5, 2015 11:20 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Blogs | Comments

A new program, co-funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and National Security Agency (NSA), is looking to create an interest in cyber security for the next generation. Called GenCyber, the program establishes camps and courses for teenagers that provide instruction about various tech and cyber security topics.  The program is relatively new and sparsely funded at this point, but increasing demand may change that very soon. 

Summer Camps with a Mission: To Create Cyber Security Experts

May 5, 2015 11:13 am | by Wilson Ring, Associated Press | News | Comments

The camps are part of an expanding but modestly funded program called GenCyber that is funded by the National Science Foundation and National Security Agency. The agencies are taking the long view in fulfilling an insatiable need for cyber security experts, both in government and private industry.

Nepal: 'We Will Need Huge Foreign Support for Reconstruction"

May 5, 2015 11:09 am | by Binaj Gurubacharya, Associated Press | News | Comments

 Nepal's government will need immense international support as the Himalayan nation begins turning its attention toward reconstruction in the coming weeks, in the wake of the devastating April earthquake, a top official said.  Nepal is one of the world's poorest nations, and its economy, largely based on tourism, has been crippled by the earthquake.

Troubled Forecasters Seek Way to Improve Tornado Warnings

May 5, 2015 10:53 am | by Kelly Kissel, Associated Press | News | Comments

 Forecasters troubled by the high death count from twisters in Alabama and Joplin, Missouri, four years ago say they must put away their "nerd-speak" and find better ways to communicate if the public is going to react appropriately when bad weather approaches.

Baltimore Calm Wednesday, Protests Begin in Other Cities

April 30, 2015 12:18 pm | by Joe Shust, Editor | Articles | Comments

Baltimore saw another night of relative calm on Wednesday, with peaceful protesters demonstrating before dispersing during the imposed 10 p.m. curfew.  However, protests took place in other cities across the country.  The protests revolve around the death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray, who died in police custody.

'We are Hungry:' Aid Reaches Epicenter, Nepal Toll Tops 5,000

April 29, 2015 4:16 pm | by Katy Daigle, Associated Press | News | Comments

Unlike in Nepal's capital, where most buildings were spared complete collapse, the tiny hamlets clinging to the remote mountainsides of Gorkha District have been ravaged. Entire clusters of homes were reduced to piles of stone and splintered wood. Orange plastic tarps used for shelter now dot the cliff sides and terraced rice paddies carved into the land.

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