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The Lead

The Importance of Public/Private Partnerships

July 1, 2015 10:46 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Videos | Comments

John Jackson, Executive Vice President of Fusion Risk Management,  discusses public/private partnerships and their importance in business continuity planning.  He talks about some of the ways business continuity professionals can leverage these partnerships to improve their programs.

Appeals Court: Former BP Engineer Should Get New Trial

July 1, 2015 9:32 am | by Kevin McGill, Associated Press | News | Comments

 A former BP engineer is entitled to a new trial on an obstruction of justice charge stemming...

Teens storm Georgia Wal-Mart in wild rampage of destruction

July 1, 2015 9:06 am | News | Comments

Authorities in central Georgia say up to 50 teenagers bent on destruction raced into a Wal-Mart...

Family of Businessman Killed in Train Crash Sues Amtrak

June 30, 2015 11:49 am | by Maryclaire Dale, Associated Press | News | Comments

The family of a businessman killed when a speeding passenger train derailed near Philadelphia...

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Weekly news and features for business continuity professionals

The Worst Floods of 2015 (So Far)

June 25, 2015 11:17 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Articles | Comments

Difficult to prepare for and impossible to stop, floods are among the most dangerous disasters that business continuity professionals can face.  A bad flood can shut a business down for days and keep employees out of the office for much, much longer.  Here are the five worst floods of 2015 so far.

Storm Cleanup Begins in PA, NJ; Nearly 400K Without Psower

June 25, 2015 11:04 am | by Shawn Marsh, Associated Press | News | Comments

Powerful storms that thundered through eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Connecticut downed trees and power lines, leaving nearly 400,000 customers without electricity and disrupting mass transit service in all three states.  The strong storm system was the same that had spawned tornadoes in the Midwest, including at least nine in northern Illinois.

With Low Numbers of New Cases, Ebola Vaccine Trials Fight Odds of Success

June 23, 2015 11:34 am | by Helen Branswell, Associated Press | News | Comments

 New Ebola infections in Guinea and Sierra Leone are down to a trickle. That means while there may still be time to prove if experimental Ebola vaccines protect against the dreaded disease, the chances of success are becoming slimmer.  The teams trying to do that critical research know the odds are stacked against most of the trials that are underway.

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North Korea Claims it has Cure for MERS, Ebola and AIDS

June 23, 2015 11:32 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

North Korea says it has succeeded where the greatest minds in science have failed.  The authoritarian, impoverished nation better known for pursuing a nuclear program despite global criticism announced it has a drug can prevent and cure MERS, Ebola, SARS and AIDS.

Brand Tarnished, Cardinals Likely to Avoid Economic Damage

June 23, 2015 11:29 am | by Jim Salter, Associated Press | News | Comments

The St. Louis Cardinals have been the toast of their Midwestern city for generations, a source of civic pride as one of baseball's most successful and cherished franchises.  Suddenly, they're an embarrassment, under federal investigation for allegedly hacking into the computer database of an opponent, the Houston Astros, whose general manager, Jeff Luhnow, is a former Cardinals executive.

Disaster Planning a Continuing Focus for BC Pros

June 16, 2015 11:25 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Articles | Comments

Recent disasters, like the earthquakes in Nepal and floods in Texas and Oklahoma, have once again put the focus on businesses staying operational during and recovering from drastic events.  Preparing for these events can be crucial, as disasters can cost businesses financially as well as other ways.  Some businesses never recover from large storms or natural disasters.

Quake-Hit Nepal Reopens Damaged Heritage Sites for Tourists

June 15, 2015 3:51 pm | by Binaj Gurubacharya, Associated Press | News | Comments

Nepal on reopened most of the cultural heritage sites that were damaged in a pair of devastating earthquakes, hoping to lure back foreign tourists.  The April 25 and May 12 quakes killed more than 8,700 people and damaged hundreds of thousands of buildings in Nepal, including old temples, palaces and other historical structures that are popular with tourists.

California Orders Large Water Cuts for Farmers

June 15, 2015 3:41 pm | by Fenit Nirappil and Scott Smith, Associated Press | News | Comments

As California grapples with a relentless drought, state regulators on Friday ordered farmers and others who hold some of the strongest water rights in the state to stop all pumping from three major waterways in one of country's prime farm regions.

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Oil Spill Shows Value of Continuity Planning

June 11, 2015 10:40 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Blogs | Comments

According to about 1,200 pages of records, provided by Texas-Based Plains All-American Pipeline, the recent pipeline breach in California was unlikely to happen and any issues could be detected by its systems, which may not have worked properly in the hours leading to the spill.  All of this shows how important business continuity, resilience and effective planning are.

NTSB Says Amtrak Engineer Didn't Use Cellphone Before Crash

June 10, 2015 4:25 pm | by Joan Lowy, Associated Press | News | Comments

The engineer driving an Amtrak train wasn't using his cellphone just before the train derailed in Philadelphia last month, safety investigators said, deepening the mystery of what caused the accident that killed eight and injured about 200.

South Korea Says its Deadly MERS Outbreak May Have Peaked

June 10, 2015 3:55 pm | by Hyung-Jin Kim and Kim Tong-Hyung, Associated Press | News | Comments

South Korea believes its MERS virus outbreak may have peaked, and experts say the next several days will be critical to determining whether the government's belated efforts have successfully stymied a disease that has killed nine people and infected more than 100 in the country.

Oil Train Disaster Settlement Fund Reaches $345 Million

June 10, 2015 3:47 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

 The compensation fund for victims of a fiery oil train derailment that claimed 47 lives in a small town in Quebec has grown to $345 million with a contribution from the company that owned the shipment.  World Fuel Services Corp., which was accused in a lawsuit of downplaying the volatility of the crude oil from North Dakota's Bakken shale region, agreed to contribute $110 million to the settlement fund.

Sinclair Lawsuit Blames 2013 Refinery Fire on Faulty Valve

June 10, 2015 3:38 pm | by Mead Gruver, Associated Press | News | Comments

 A lawsuit filed by the owner of a Wyoming refinery alleges six companies played roles in the installation of a valve that failed, causing a fire and $135 million in damage to the plant.   Salt Lake City-based Sinclair alleges the cause was a hydrogen gas control valve that failed in the refinery's hydrotreater.

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Request by Exxon to Haul Oil After Pipeline Break Denied

June 10, 2015 3:33 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

 Officials denied a request by Exxon Mobil to temporarily use tanker trucks to transport crude oil from offshore wells through Santa Barbara County after a recent pipeline break that has become the state's largest coastal oil spill in 25 years.

After Hacking, Government Workers Warned of Potential Fraud

June 9, 2015 11:25 am | by Ted Bridis, Ken Dilanian and Eric Tucker, Associated Press | News | Comments

An immense hack of millions of government personnel files is being treated as the work of foreign spies who could use the information to fake their way into more-secure computers and plunder U.S. secrets.  Federal employees were told in a video to change all their passwords, put fraud alerts on their credit reports and watch for attempts by foreign intelligence services to exploit them.

Amtrak CEO Vows to Put Safety Technology into Operation

June 3, 2015 2:48 pm | by Joan Lowy, Associated Press | News | Comments

An emotional Amtrak CEO pledged to lawmakers that safety technology that could have prevented a deadly derailment last month in Philadelphia will be put into operation, while Democrats and Republicans exchanged barbs over whether Congress or the Obama administration is most to blame for railroads not installing the technology.

UN Chief Urges All Nations to Help End Ebola in West Africa

June 3, 2015 2:27 pm | by Edith Lederer, Associated Press | News | Comments

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon warned that as long as there is one Ebola case in West Africa "all countries are at risk" and urged all nations to support the final battles to wipe out the deadly disease in Sierra Leone and Guinea.  Liberia, once the worst affected country, is now Ebola free, but Ban warned that in Sierra Leone and Guinea "the battle has not yet been won" and "any lapse in vigilance could allow the virus to spread."

Copter Chartered by Aid Group Crashes in Nepal, Killing Four

June 3, 2015 2:18 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

A helicopter chartered by Doctors Without Borders crashed in quake-damaged northeast Nepal and four people on board were killed, police and the aid group said.  The helicopter was returning to Kathmandu when it crashed on Yamuna Danda hill near Balefi village, Nepal Police spokesman Kamal Singh Bam said.

Social Media Plays Critical Role in Reporting, Responding to and Humanizing Disasters

June 2, 2015 11:50 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Articles | Comments

Social media has changed, and is continuing to change, the way organizations and individuals understand, respond to and recover from disasters.  Now more than ever, the world can see the impact of events like the Texas floods as the happen through the eyes of those most affected by them.

Sun Returns to Texas, Revealing Flood Damage Across State

June 1, 2015 4:08 pm | by Allen Reed and David Warren, Associated Press | News | Comments

Parts of the state were finally beginning to recover Sunday from weeks of rain and flooding that have made Texas a place of extremes: severe drought conditions earlier in the year that have given way to unprecedented rainfall in some areas. At least 31 people have been killed in storms that began in Texas and Oklahoma over Memorial Day weekend.

Malaysia Air CEO says Carrier Could Break Even by 2018

June 1, 2015 4:00 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

The new CEO of Malaysia Airlines said the ailing carrier could break even by 2018 after cutting staff, selling surplus aircraft and refurbishing its international fleet.  Christoph Mueller said the airline is trying to sell two of its A380 super jumbo jets and has gone ahead with its previously announced plan to cut 6,000 of its 20,000 staff.

CDC: 150 Possibly had Contact with Lassa Fever Victim

June 1, 2015 3:53 pm | by Mike Stobbe, Associated Press | News | Comments

 Federal and state health officials have identified more than 150 people who possibly had contact with a patient who died of Lassa fever, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.  So far, most of those people face no danger, but six are at a high risk of having been exposed, CDC spokesman Benjamin Haynes said in a statement. Thirty-three are at low risk. All are being monitored, Haynes said.

Bangladesh Files Murder Charges in 2013 Building Collapse

June 1, 2015 3:51 pm | by Julhas Alam, Associated Press | News | Comments

The charges were filed against 41 people, including the building's owner, Sohel Rana, and his parents and more than a dozen government officials, for their direct role in the deaths of 1,137 people in the collapse of Rana Plaza, said the lead investigator, Bijoy Krishna Kar of the Criminal Investigation Department.

Material Being Lifted by crane in NYC Falls; 10 Injured

June 1, 2015 3:45 pm | by Verena Dobnik, Associated Press | News | Comments

 A massive air-conditioning unit being lifted by a crane to the top of a Manhattan office building broke free, fell 28 stories and landed in the middle of Madison Avenue, injuring 10 people, officials said.  Two were construction workers, while the others were pedestrians and occupants of passing cars, Mayor Bill de Blasio said. All were struck by debris that caused minor injuries; they were treated at hospitals.

Despite Low Death Rate, Lassa Fever Worth Watching

May 28, 2015 11:33 am | by Joe Shust, Editor | Articles | Comments

A New Jersey man died Monday from Lassa Fever, a rare infectious disease that originates in West Africa, after returning from Liberia.  According to the Centers for Disease Control, the disease is endemic to West Africa and is named after the town in Nigeria where it was first discovered in 1969.  While the disease is uncommon in the United States, that is not the case in West Africa.

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